Tuesday, January 10, 2017

Iodine and Cancer A summary of the evidence to date By Tina Kaczor, ND, FABNO

About the Author
Tina Kaczor, ND, FABNO, is editor in chief of Natural Medicine Journal and a naturopathic physician, board certified in naturopathic oncology. She received her naturopathic doctorate from National College of Natural Medicine, Portland, Oregon, and completed her residency in naturopathic oncology at Cancer Treatment Centers of America, Tulsa, Oklahoma. Kaczor received undergraduate degrees from the State University of New York at Buffalo. She is the past president and treasurer of the Oncology Association of Naturopathic Physicians and secretary of the American Board of Naturopathic Oncology. She has been published in several peer-reviewed journals. Kaczor is based in Eugene, Oregon.

Abstract

Iodine is an essential element in human physiology. Its role in thyroid function is well known and heavily weighted in the literature. Its putative role as an anticarcinogenic agent is just beginning to be widely appreciated. The molecular effects of iodine as well as ongoing epidemiological evidence points to its probable role in prevention of cancers through its antioxidant, antiinflammatory, prodifferentiating, and proapoptotic effects. This is particularly evident with stomach and breast cancers but may be relevant for many other cancers that have yet to be substantially studied.
Introduction

The first report of geographical regions with high rates of goiter having higher rates of cancer mortality was published in 1924.1,2 Ongoing epidemiological data has corroborated the association between goitrogenous regions and cancer incidence/mortality, particularly that of stomach cancer.3,4 Epidemiological evidence also suggests that thyroid disorders, particularly goiter, may be associated with breast cancer incidence and/or mortality.5–8 Other cancers associated with goitrogenic state include prostate cancer, endometrial, ovarian, colorectal, and thyroid cancer. It is not clear whether these associations are due to an underlying hypothyroid state, the presence of occult autoimmune processes, or iodine deficiency itself.9 Ultimately, the etiology of all cancers is multifactorial, with benefit assumed in the reduction of modifiable risk factors. There is substantial evidence that iodine deficiency is a modifiable risk factor in cancers of the stomach and breast and possibly many other organs. This review will outline evidence on iodine as an independent influence in cancer development and/or progression.
Read more http://www.naturalmedicinejournal.com/journal/2014-06/iodine-and-cancer