Sunday, January 18, 2015

Guantanamo Bay staff sergeant claims three men believed to have committed suicide were actually tortured to death

Staff Sgt. Joseph Hickman, a Marine veteran who reenlisted in the Maryland National Guard after 9/11, contradicts the military version of events in his new book, 'Murder at Camp Delta: A Staff Sergeant’s Pursuit of the Truth About Guantanamo Bay.'
BY SHERRYL CONNELLY
NEW YORK DAILY NEWS
Saturday, January 17, 2015, 6:57 PM

COLIN PERKEL/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Three men the Pentagon says killed themselves were actually tortured to death by the CIA claims a Guantanamo Bay staff sergeant.

It was murder.
A staff sergeant at Guantanamo Bay claims to have solved one of the military prison’s greatest mysteries: Three men the Pentagon says killed themselves were actually tortured to death by the CIA.

The official government line was that Yasser Talal al-Zahrani of Yemen, and Salah Ahmed al-Salami and Mani Shaman al-Utaybi, both of Saudi Arabia, killed themselves in 2006 in a suicide pact.

Rear Adm. Harry Harris, the commander of the Joint Task Force Guantanamo, called the deaths “an asymmetric warfare committed against us.” The men were said to have hanged themselves.

Staff Sgt. Joseph Hickman, a Marine veteran who reenlisted in the Maryland National Guard after 9/11, contradicts the military version of events in his new book, “Murder at Camp Delta: A Staff Sergeant’s Pursuit of the Truth About Guantanamo Bay.” And he paints a sinister picture of the government’s use of the prison as a “battle lab” for cruelly inventive, experimental torture tactics.
Staff Sgt. Joseph Hickman, a Marine veteran who reenlisted in the Maryland National Guard after 9/11, contradicts the military version of events in his new book, 'Murder at Camp Delta: A Staff Sergeant’s Pursuit of the Truth About Guantanamo Bay.'

“It is my informed opinion that there were three wrongful deaths at Gitmo on June 9, 2006, while I was on duty,” Hickman wrote.

The deaths of the three men — ages, 20, 30 and 37 — were a low point for Hickman, who was excited when his 629th Military Intelligence Battalion was deployed to Gitmo.