Tuesday, January 13, 2015

Beyond Prevention: Chemical in Broccoli Kills Cancer Cells

Monday, January 12, 2015 | 0 comments

New research has identified one of the key cancer-fighting mechanisms for sulforaphane, and suggests that this much-studied phytochemical may be able to move beyond cancer prevention and toward therapeutic use for advanced prostate cancer.

Scientists said that pharmacologic doses in the form of supplements would be needed for actual therapies, beyond the amount of sulforaphane that would ordinarily be obtained from dietary sources such as broccoli. Research also needs to verify the safety of this compound when used at such high levels.

But a growing understanding of how sulforaphane functions and is able to selectively kill cancer cells indicate it may have value in treating metasticized cancer, and could work alongside existing approaches.

The new findings on the unique abilities of sulforaphane were recently published in the journal Oncogenesis, by researchers from Oregon State University and the Texas A&M Health Science Center. The work was supported by the National Institutes of Health.

"There's significant evidence of the value of cruciferous vegetables in cancer prevention," said Emily Ho, professor and director of the Moore Family Center for Whole Grain Foods, Nutrition and Preventive Health in the OSU College of Public Health and Human Sciences, and lead author on this research.

"However, this study is one of the first times we've shown how sulforaphane can affect a histone methylation and alter gene expression in metasticized prostate cancer cells," said Ho, who is also a principal investigator in OSU's Linus Pauling Institute. "It begins a process that can help to re-express tumor suppressors, leading to the selective death of cancer cells and slowing disease progression."- See more at: