Sunday, October 26, 2014

French "hate speech" lawsuit leading to worldwide online censorship

The Jewish Daily Forward recently published an article describing how large Internet-based social media companies, including Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube, are dealing with online "hate speech," particularly in the aftermath of a judicial ruling roughly one year ago in France that required Twitter to remove "anti-Semitic" content. The article notes:

A little over a year after a French court forced Twitter to remove some anti-Semitic content, experts say the ruling has had a ripple effect, leading other Internet companies to act more aggressively against hate speech in an effort to avoid lawsuits.

The 2013 ruling by the Paris Court of Appeals settled a lawsuit brought the year before by the Union of Jewish Students of France over the hashtag #UnBonJuif, which means “a good Jew” and which was used to index thousands of anti-Semitic comments that violated France’s law against hate speech.

Since then, YouTube has permanently banned videos posted by Dieudonne, a French comedian with 10 convictions for inciting racial hatred against Jews. And in February, Facebook removed the page of French Holocaust denier Alain Soral for “repeatedly posting things that don’t comply with the Facebook terms,” according to the company. Soral’s page had drawn many complaints in previous years but was only taken down this year.

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