Monday, August 4, 2014

sun Sun exposure cuts the risk of certain cancers in half


(NaturalNews) It's an absolute miracle, an alliance of divine life, how the Earth is positioned, so delicately in relation to the sun. Two stellar bodies communicating with such intricacy and harmony in space and time, one sphere rotating in seasonal rhythm, the other projecting flares of brilliant heat and light.

Every living thing -- from dragonflies to orangutans, from dandelions to oak trees, from mushrooms to humans -- peers beyond their plot on the sphere of Earth, looking up through the atmosphere to absorb the ever-powerful rays of the flaming sun.

In the industrialized world, many men and women have fled to the shade, working under roofs day in and day out. Naturally, the skin craves the sun's light; it yearns for its immune-system-stimulating vitamin D, but humans today often go for long periods without absorbing these powerful rays. Spending a little time basking in this great energy source creates a disconnection between humans and their health, between humans and their energy fields.

Do you see the sun as cancer-causing or cancer-preventing?

We are less acclimated to the natural heat and light of the sun. We are less at one with this life-giving power. Our skin can easily lack vital antioxidants, too. The sun's rays are not always used effectively anymore, especially when the skin and body are not properly acclimated to absorb the sun's energy. The sun may burn, may cause skin to peel, creating fear of sun and fear of skin cancer.

But the majestic energy source we call the sun may not be to blame, even though some medical authorities have suggested that it is the evil behind many skin cancer cases today.

According to studies conducted by Professor Rachel Neale from the QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute in Brisbane, Australia, cancer risk can actually be slashed significantly, in HALF, when people are exposed to more time in the sun. In her studies, she found out that those who lived in areas receiving higher levels of UV rays had a 30 to 40 percent lower chance of being diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. Some epidemiology studies showed how excess sun exposure can cut the risk of certain cancers by 50 percent.

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