Tuesday, August 26, 2014

New Anti Police State App Helps You “See Something, Say Something” in Real-Time


smart phone
Recent studies have shown that police are held almost completely unaccountable by the current systems of governmental oversight. Perhaps this is the reason why you are 9 times more likely to be killed by a law enforcement officer than a terrorist. Rather than wait for bloated bureaucracy or corrupt government to save the day, we as activists have to find our own solutions. Technology is one of these solutions.
As we have seen, the violent crackdown on independent journalism in Ferguson is a sign of a worsening situation in much of America. More than ever, each citizen needs to become a member of the media and record everything that they see during encounters with the police.
A new smartphone app called Sidekik aims to make it as easy as possible for you not only to record the police and upload that recording offsite, but to put you in immediate contact with legal representation to help you navigate the encounter … in real-time.
Please view additional details and their Indiegogo campaign video below if you would like to support this new anti police state tool.

What is Sidekik?

Sidekik is a mobile application which will perform two key actions simultaneously. One, Sidekik will activate your smartphone’s audio and video recording devices and begin streaming the data to a secure facility. Two, Sidekik will initiate a video call and connect you with an attorney who will represent you in whatever situation you find yourself.
Why is Sidekik Important?
When you are in a critical situation, such as being pulled over by law enforcement, the balance of power is often against you. The fact is that most people don’t know their rights or how to enforce them. In addition, without a record of your encounter with law enforcement, the question of what happened during the encounter devolves into your word against that of the officer, which normally results with courts and public opinion in favor of the officer, regardless of what actually occurred. Though many people have begun recording their interactions with law enforcement, the recording is stored on the recording device, which is sometimes confiscated.

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