Sunday, August 24, 2014

Florida hit by corruption, entire police force fired


Florida hit by corruption, entire police force fired

One Florida town has been hit by corruption and it is so bad, the entire police force has been fired. The most corrupt city in the state has been exposed for its unlawful ways during a recent audit. All cops and elected officials in office have been let go or will be soon as this is just one of the stipulations that had to be followed to spare the city of Hampton, as its corruption runs deep.

The one horse town celebrated its victory in a church this past Friday night. The townspeople broke out into smiles after finding out two Florida policymakers quit their journey to take away Hampton's cityhood. The 89-year-old city, with a population of 477, was on a tight rope after an audit came out in February revealing a plethora of violations. It found 31 federal, state, and local codes were broken, with allegations surrounds double-dipping and using city property for personal reasons.
The quaint city was already known as an infamous speed trap zone but gained even more publicity as a small-town with big corruption when lawmakers threated to pull its city charter a month ago. However, the townspeople persevered. Within a matter of four weeks, they had come up with an outline that persuaded Representative Charles Van Zant and Senator Rob Bradley to allow them to keep their city. They won the tough battle with all odds against them.
"Thank you for the work that has been done," Bradley told the crowd of 50 gathered Friday at Victory Baptist Church, according to a CNN article, "You've got a lot more to do, but boy. ..." He clearly was impressed, as was Van Zant, who said, "You've done yeoman's work. I think you've done well."
Trouble arose in a quite innocent way according to the newly hired city attorney John Cooper. A Texaco gas station on nearby US 301 asked for cops to protect the place after a couple of bad accidents and homicides took place. Then, Hampton annexed a 1,200-foot stretch of highway. Later on though, someone arrived at the idea that a lot of easy cash was to be made from pulling over speeders and writing up tickets they would have to pay.
When Hampton's map was redrawn, it resembled a giant mosquito, draining money straight from the highway. The biggest issue at the time was the police department as it was constantly going over its budget and the revenue from the tickets did not seem to make its way to any person working outside of its city hall building.
The amount of officers increased to 19, which included the chief. However, Bradford County Sheriff Gordon Smith confessed that a bunch of the cops were not at all trained in the proper manner. What is worse, the audit discovered that a couple of them had been driving uninsured vehicles. One policeman, who was better known as "Rambo," kept an assault rifle strapped across his chest just to write up traffic tickets.
By April 2013, Van Zant requested for the state auditor general to check into the city's budget situation. At the time, Mayor Barry Layne Moore was locked up in Bradford County jail when the audit was publicly released. He and other officials had an idea that the audit would come back with poor marks though, nobody knew how bad it would actually turn out.

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